Tag Archives: grandchildren

A VERY BUSY LAP

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I had been working on a blogpost to update readers on developments in Europe, when I had to go collect our four-year-old grandson, Leeson, from school.   From there, we went to the dollar store.   I’ve learned that the dollar store is the only store I can take him, as “everything is one dollar” and it won’t cost me too much, no matter what he wants.

Within 30 seconds, he had chosen four dinosaurs (= $4 + tax).   As we walked down the aisle, he changed his mind and chose four ice cream cone shaped bubbles toys.   So I suggested he take back the dinosaurs. When we reached the dinosaur collection, he saw other toys he wanted.   Four of them, of course.   (Is this because he’s aged 4?   Will he want 5 when he’s five?   This could get very expensive!)

I thought it best to vacate the store ASAP, before he asked for other things. I managed to persuade him to only get two toys, for a total of $2.12 with tax.

We drove home.

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His seven-month-old brother, Hayden, wanted me to pick him up out of his baby chair.   He prefers sitting in my lap to being alone in his chair.   While seated on my lap, he often just looks at me, staring for long periods of time.   It’s touching. I think I represent fun.   My wife says that’s not what it is – he just likes food and is always fascinated by what I’m eating!

Anyway, I thought I would watch the news while holding him.   The next thing I remember was Diane waking me up, with the baby screaming on my lap.   I hadn’t even noticed.

I’ve had a bad cough and chest cold for about a week now.   I can’t sleep at night.  I just cough all night.   I do manage to doze off in my recliner, which is the only way to get any sleep.   But it’s not enough, so I fell asleep holding the baby.

Five minutes after the baby was taken away from me, Leeson wanted to sit on my lap and look at dinosaurs on my laptop (do you see why it takes so long to write an article?).   I got a dinosaur cartoon on the screen.   At this point, he looked up at me and said: “I love you, Grandpa!”  I responded with:  “I love you, too!”   He came right back with:  “I love you, three!”  “Well, I love you four.”   “I love you 5, Grandpa.”   Then he quickly added:   “No, I love you 8.”

I can see now why “ONE toy” quickly turns into 8 when we go to the dollar store!   I tried to explain that from five you go to six.   But he still insisted on 8.   I can see this is going to take some time!

For a while, he was joined on my lap by his younger brother, who was returned to me.   Fortunately, their older brother, Aubren, is still in school – I have to go get him in ten minutes.   When I do get him, he will want to go with me to get a “slushie,” which is a weekly treat I buy him.

When we get home, there may be three of them on my lap, watching either dinosaurs or trains on my laptop, “Super Why” on TV or a DVD I’ve seen at least a 100 times!

Three on my lap is my limit nowadays.   A few years ago, all four girls would sit on my lap when they were together; until I developed circulatory issues.   Now I can only take three.   And, frankly, there’s a definite time limit on it!   I can no longer be buried under grandchildren.

Talking of being buried, the two granddaughters who live near us recently lost their other grandfather, who died when the truck he was driving rolled over in an accident.   It was very traumatizing for them.  Naturally, they keep talking about it and have expressed some concern that I will be next.

I was driving them home from school one day recently when we passed the cemetery.   They began encouraging me to stake out a plot on the side of the main road that is nearest to our house.   That way they could come visit and talk to me!   Perhaps they said that because they felt nobody seems to listen to them – at least I would be a captive audience.

This was not the time for a deep theological discussion.   They clearly were worried about losing me and I reassured them that I intend to be here for a while; but I also said if anything happened to me, they’ve still got Grandma, their parents, aunts and uncles, cousins, etc.

But it’s nice to know they will visit me when I’m no longer able to go see them or give them rides!

With that, I must leave to go get Aubren, who turns 5 next month.

Footnote:   Hayden, pictured above, finally has a surgery date of February 8th. He has to have major cranial surgery.  He was scheduled twice before and it had to be postponed due to an ear infection.  Prayers would be very  much appreciated.

 

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GRANDCHILDREN, THE DEBATE AND THE CANADIAN CROWN

Evan very upset he couldn't have that "juice."
Evan very upset he couldn’t have that juice.

We’re visiting our daughter, Alix, her husband, Mike, and their family in Indianapolis.   Seven of our grandchildren are with us in the house. Our son’s two girls had to stay behind for basketball try-outs on Sunday.

The 5-hour drive south was stressful, to put it mildly.   Not only did we have to contend with road construction that seriously impacted our speed but we had three young children in the van, one of whom hates traveling and kept asking to go home.   Even after we arrived, he still wanted to go home, asking Grandpa if we could leave late at night just to get away from it all. He must have sensed my stress!

It’s now Friday lunchtime.   Just as I sat down to write, Evan, one of Alix’s twins, rode in a laundry basket down the steep stairs and crashed into the front door.   He’s ok – I’m not sure about the door and the laundry basket has definitely seen better days!  (Not to mention Alix’s heart failure!)

A few moments earlier, our autistic grandson who has a tendency to run away and get lost, knocked on the front door.   We’ve no idea how he got out but at least he came back.   He’s 4.   He’s a late developer – I ran away when I was 3.

Evan is clearly a troublemaker.   I have been sipping whisky in an attempt to kill a sore throat, though it doubles as a coping mechanism with all the activity around me.   I just looked up to find Evan took my whisky bottle over to his mom and asked her to pour him some “juice.”

In spite of the occasional stress of sheer numbers, I still think that the opportunity to have time with grandchildren is a tremendous blessing and we truly enjoy every minute of it.

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We are, of course, in Mike Pence territory. He’s been Governor of Indiana for four years and is highly spoken of by, seemingly, everybody.   He’s done a good job governing the state, which has a financial surplus.

I thought he was treated badly on Monday by his opponent Tim Kaine in the Vice Presidential debate.   Mr. Kaine kept on interrupting Mr. Pence so that he could not get his points across.   Kaine was rude while Pence responded like a gentleman.

Another difference between them was over the issue of abortion. Kaine squirmed and waffled while trying to explain how he supports abortion when his own church, the Church of Rome, is against it.   He said he felt it would be wrong of him to force his own view on women who want abortions.   Mr. Pence, a Protestant and regular church-goer, reaffirmed his total opposition to abortion and said that, as Governor of Indiana, he has been promoting adoption as a means of encouraging women to give birth, rather than have their unborn child murdered.   He reminded viewers that Mrs. Clinton supports partial-birth abortions, allowing women to abort babies when they are close to delivery.   He even quoted Jeremiah 1:5 “Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you.”

Mrs. Clinton supposedly takes her Christianity seriously – she’s a Methodist, a church now opposed to abortion.

Kaine and Clinton can only be described as hypocrites, supporting the murder of innocent children, while claiming to both be people of faith.

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This year’s US presidential election cannot be encouraging any country to adopt the American system of government.   Comments heard overseas are along the lines of:   “Out of 330 million people, this is the best you can come up with?”

The ignorance of the rest of the world shown by Gary (“What’s Aleppo?”) Johnson, who is now claiming that knowledge of world affairs is “over-rated,” must be another influencing factor.

So, it’s not surprising that Canadians welcomed Prince William, his wife and two children, to British Columbia and Yukon.   The future King and Queen of Canada, with their son, Prince George, who will succeed his father on the throne 40 or 50 years from now, ensure that Canada’s current system of government will endure for the rest of this century.

Canada is a constitutional monarchy, just like the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.   There are also 13 other Commonwealth Realms over which the Queen reigns.   In addition, she is Head of the 53-nation Commonwealth of former British colonies.   The British government has no authority over any of these countries.

Although many people think the 90-year-old Queen doesn’t do anything, the left-wing Independent newspaper in Britain wrote the following on her responsibilities:

“Her schedule is incredibly regimented, with multiple formal proceedings, events and processes she has to adhere to every day.

Meetings with ministers and officials take up a large portion of her day and, like most of us, she spends a big chunk of her time at work.

Morning

The Queen’s working day begins at her desk scanning the daily newspapers.   She then proceeds to go through some of the 300 letters she receives from the general public every day.   Some of these letters the Queen reads and replies to herself, while with others she tells members of her staff how she would like them to be answered.

Her Majesty will then see two of her private secretaries with the daily quota of official papers and documents.   She receives a huge number of correspondences from Government ministers and her representatives in the Commonwealth and foreign countries.   All of these have to be read and, where necessary, approved and signed.

A series of official meetings or ‘audiences’ will often follow.   Each meeting usually lasting 10 to 20 minutes.

If there is an Investiture, a ceremony for the presentation of honors and decorations, it begins at 11.00am and lasts just over an hour.

The Queen will then lunch privately although every couple of months, she and The Duke of Edinburgh will invite a dozen guests from a wide variety of backgrounds to an informal lunch.

If Her Majesty is spending the morning on engagements away from her desk and other commitments, she will visit up to three venues before lunch, either alone or jointly with The Duke of Edinburgh.

Afternoon

In the afternoons, the Queen often goes out on public engagements and prepares for each visit by briefing herself on who she will be meeting and what she will be seeing and doing.   Her Majesty carries out around 430 engagements (including audiences) a year and will regularly go out for the whole day to a particular region or city.

The afternoon draws to an end with a meeting of the Privy Council with several government ministers.

Evening

Early evening can involve the weekly meeting with the Prime Minister, which usually takes place on Wednesdays at 6.30pm.” (Independent, 9/9/15)

She is also available to all Commonwealth leaders.

Prince Charles will inherit the same responsibilities, as will Prince William, then George, in turn.

In contrast to the US, where party politics has seriously damaged the unity of the country, the Queen brings people together in a non-political way.

Western democracies, in the main, have one of three distinctly different forms of democracy.

The US presidential system is one.

The “Westminster” (British system) is another.   This is just as democratic.   People elect their representatives to parliament.   The dominant party’s leader becomes the prime minister.   The Queen remains outside of politics, but contributes greatly to political stability and national unity.

The third option is a mix of the two, with a parliamentary form of government and a prime minister but, instead of a monarch, there is an appointed figurehead president, with similar powers to the British monarch.   The Germans, Italians and Irish have this form of government.   A serious weakness was shown with this system in 1934, when the German president died suddenly and the new Chancellor, Adolf Hitler, simply abolished the office and had himself proclaimed “Fuhrer.”   This could not happen in a constitutional monarchy – when the Queen dies, automatically Charles becomes King.

Although some people in Canada would like to see the tie with the Crown abolished when the Queen dies, Canadian John Fraser summed up their arguments this way:   “Queen Elizabeth has done a great job for Canada; therefore let’s make sure there is no monarchy when she dies.”  (“The Secret of the Crown,” John Fraser, 2012)   The reasoning really doesn’t make sense.

Fraser points out that Canada is one of the most successful countries in the world, thanks partly to its political system, which includes a major role for the Crown.   The country’s birth owes its origin to the Crown and the people’s allegiance to it. Even the current Liberal Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, is committed to maintaining the tie with the Crown – indeed, he invited William and Kate to Canada, along with their two children.   Next year, Prince Charles and his wife will be in Canada to join in celebrations for the 150th anniversary of confederation.

 

INDIANA’S CRUCIAL VOTE

Mike Pence, Indiana Governor, endorses Cruz
Mike Pence, Indiana Governor, endorses Cruz

Our eldest daughter, husband and children live in Indianapolis, about a 4-hour drive away from us.   We go down there as often as we can to see them, but we always wish we could see more of them.

Diane, my wife, is down there now to help look after the four children while our daughter recuperates from routine surgery.  I stayed behind as our youngest daughter is about to have her third child.

That will make a total of nine grandchildren.  Two of them live with us.  Soon that will be three.   All boys.   All full of life, with lots of energy.   They can be a lot of fun.   I often wish we’d had grandchildren first!

Our frequent visits to Indiana have impressed us.   The state is more conservative than Michigan.   It has a positive, upbeat feel about it, while Michigan can sometimes be a bit depressing – the economy has struggled for as long as we’ve been here and the weather doesn’t help!

Tuesday will be a big day in Indiana, which is holding a crucial primary.

Friends in Indiana have been saying that Ted Cruz will win the Republican primary as he’s the most conservative candidate and, besides, Donald Trump is crazy and unpredictable.  The popular Governor of the state came out and endorsed Cruz last week, even though he has a lot of respect for Trump.

But the latest opinion poll shows that Trump is winning the Republican primary in the state.   He’s winning by 15%.   Mrs. Clinton is winning the Democratic primary, but only by 4%.   Donald Trump is confounding everybody.   Why is he so popular?   Although he does hold some conservative views, Ted Cruz is definitely more conservative, so why does Trump appeal to so many Republicans?

It seems to come down to two issues and an additional third factor.

The first issue is the economy.   Although there are pockets around the country that are doing well, many Americans do not feel that it is.  They blame trade deals with other countries for taking away the good paying jobs; they also blame government.   The federal government seems to take more and more of the national pie, paying employees well and giving them annual increases.   This is not the reality for people in the private sector, who are paying for it all.

Donald Trump has become the national spokesman for blue-collar workers, many of them going under in this economy.   A cover story in the latest Atlantic Monthly magazine is about America’s secret shame, that almost 50% of families cannot put $400 together in an emergency.   That means they cannot fix the car or get urgent medical treatment for one of their children.

It’s ironic but the Republican Party of Donald Trump is the party of the working-class; whereas the Democratic Party of Hillary Clinton is the party of the intellectual elite.

Whereas Bernie Sanders received donations that averaged $27, Mrs. Clinton held fundraisers where those in attendance had to donate a minimum of $33,000.

The political system has been turned upside down.

If the party conventions nominate Trump and Clinton, polls suggest the latter will win by 10% and become the first woman in the White House.

That brings us to the second issue – immigration.   Tied in with that is terrorism.   The two are often linked in people’s minds.

Donald Trump said what many think, questioning further immigration from the Muslim world until we see clearly what’s going on.

He’s also proposing a wall to keep Mexicans out.

Mrs. Clinton takes the opposite view on immigration.   That overlooks the fact that poorer people, blue-collar workers, have to compete for jobs with many of the immigrants.   It’s an example of how out of touch many politicians are.

Which brings us to the third factor.   Trump is not a professional politician like his opponents, in both the Republican and Democratic parties.

People don’t trust professional politicians.  They have been seeing a progressive decline in their standard of living and no longer feel secure thanks to five decades of myopic immigration law.

They have had enough.

Tuesday’s vote in Indiana will be a good indicator of what the future will bring.

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The same can be said for Thursday’s mayoral election in London, 4000 miles away.

A Muslim is expected to win.

This will make London the first major western capital to be led by a Muslim.

Again, it’s an indicator of what the future is going to bring!

WHERE HAVE ALL THE CHILDREN GONE?

Children

On Friday afternoon, I took two of my granddaughters to the fair.   The St. Johns Mint Festival, to be exact.   St. Johns is a small town north of Lansing, Michigan.

Their father (my son) came along, too.

We got there a little early and the only thing running was the pony rides.   At previous fairs, the girls were given a very short, once round the circle, ride for $5.  This time, they went round at least ten times for the same price.

It was hot and humid so I sat down on one of two plastic chairs.   The owner came and sat down next to me.

He told me that when he started taking his ponies to county fairs, there were hundreds of children enthusiastically wanting a ride. Now, the numbers are down to a mere handful.  He said kids would rather spend time on electronic gadgets, but then made a comment on how many millions of children have been aborted, depriving us all of the joy of seeing happy children enjoying themselves at fairs and in the streets.

The man told me he was 81.   From what he said he clearly felt I was about the same age, asking me how many GREAT grandchildren I have.   I responded by saying that all my grandchildren are great.  I added that I am “only” 64!

Later, while the girls went on other rides, I sat down at a table with a rather uncomfortable bench.   Another man, looking a bit like he might be 81, sat down next to me and ate a meal he had just bought. I asked him if he was with his grandchildren. His sad response was: “No, I’m all alone.   My family is dying out!”

Diane and I are privileged to have eight grandchildren whom we love dearly, but the Rhodes name is still dying out.   Only two of the eight have the name “Rhodes” and, when they marry, they won’t have it, so the name will go with them.   Fortunately, I have five nephews in England who will ensure the family continues, at least on that side of the Atlantic.

In a restaurant a few months ago, we met an elderly couple in their eighties, who told us they had 40 grandchildren and were awaiting the birth of their 25th great grandchild.   Can you believe that?   Yet, their familial situation would not have been unusual in previous generations.   It has become unusual in this generation; I should add “in the western world.”   It’s not unusual in many other parts of the world.   For four centuries the Bible believing Protestants, who dominated the West, took seriously God’s command to “go forth and multiply” (Gen 1:28).   That era has gone and birth control has made it possible.

It helps explain why the dynamics are changing in the United States and elsewhere.   Nations are changing hands, as they pass from one dominant ethnic group to others.  You can see this very clearly in Western Europe.   Because America is a much bigger country with a lower population density, we don’t see it as much, but demographic trends show it is still happening.

President Theodore Roosevelt warned, when the first Planned Parenthood clinic opened in 1916, that it would lead to the death of the race.   And that was before abortion. It’s not just abortion that has led to this dramatic change.   All forms of birth control have contributed to it.

But we can’t blame birth control, either.   Birth control was simply the means.   But we, the people, made it happen by choosing a higher standard of living over the responsibility of more children.

Let’s face it, we didn’t give it much thought.   It was a no-brainer.

But the result is exactly what TR said a century ago – we are now facing the death of the race.  In every country where Europeans and their descendants have dominated for centuries, significant changes are taking place.  Not one of those countries will still have a dominant western culture by the end of this century.

It’s a sobering reality and perhaps the most significant one happening right now.

A few months ago, NPR reported that Ann Arbor, one of the most affluent areas in Michigan, had seen a 40% drop in school enrollments in ten years.   Just pause for a moment and think of the effect this is going to have on the local economy.   The figure will be roughly the same across the US, except in areas with a high population of Hispanics, Muslims and others, who all have a much higher birthrate.   They may fill the gap in terms of numbers, but how much will that change the country?   Additionally, will they volunteer to defend us against our enemies, to whom many of them will feel a closer cultural connection?

Interestingly, when we visited Ann Arbor last month for medical appointments, we stopped at Costco, which now has an halal meat section occupying a significant part of the freezer area.   Headless sheep hung there, covered in burlap so that sensitive Anglo eyes would not freak out!   This is illustrative of how things are changing.

The St. Johns Mint Festival is highly unlikely to make the national news, but the declining numbers of children wanting pony rides illustrates the most significant trend in America, the fact that many couples no longer want children.

A nation that does not make the raising of children a priority is doomed to failure.   Worse . . . to extinction.

OBSERVATIONS II

Puerto rican debt

President Obama has called for urgent action on climate change, to save the environment for our children and grandchildren.

We are not likely to hear him call for massive reductions in government spending so that our children and grandchildren do not have to pay back the $18 trillion debt the last two generations have accumulated.

This problem is arguably more urgent than climate change.

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We’ve been hearing a lot about Greece recently.  The country has some serious financial problems.  Now Puerto Rico is in default.

“Puerto Rico’s outstanding debt of $72 billion is far bigger than Detroit’s $20 billion bankruptcy two years ago but a fraction of Greece’s $350 billion in obligations.  But unlike Detroit, there’s no law allowing Puerto Rico to declare bankruptcy…..  ’There’s no big daddy to rescue Puerto Rico,’ says Gary Hufbauer, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.”   (“Puerto Rico defaults on $72bn debt”, USA Today, Tuesday.)

As everyone with a credit card knows, eventually you have to pay the balance.

It’s no different with countries.

How are we, or our grandchildren going to pay off $18 trillion of national debt?   How long before it’s $20 trillion?   Will that be the psychological barrier that prompts the rest of the world to say “Enough!”?

What’s happening in Greece could also happen here.

In Athens, the Stock Market reopened yesterday after a five-week shutdown due to the financial crisis.   Shares fell dramatically, with some investors losing 25% in one day.   Shares of the Greek National Bank, once trading as high as $27.50, dropped to $0.09 Monday.

The general feeling is that the worst is yet to come.

It could also spread to other countries with a heavy debt load.

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Our economic woes are certainly increasing.  One reason is the drought, which is severely affecting some parts of the country and has been for four years.   This has led to many of the uncontrolled fires we are witnessing on the nightly news.

The drought stricken land reminds me of God’s warning to the ancient Israelites, that if they did not obey Him, there would be some serious consequences.

One of those consequences would be drought.   Note:  Deuteronomy 28:23 – “The skies above will be as unyielding as bronze, and the earth beneath will be as hard as iron.”  (New Living Translation)

Is God trying to tell us something?

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I haven’t been able to post any articles for a few days.  This is because all eight grandchildren were staying with us last week.  The four oldest, all girls, are aged 8 to 10; the four youngest, all boys, 2 & 3.   Needless to say, I spent the week pre-occupied with little time to think, let alone write.

But it was fun having them all and we’re looking forward to the next time — over the Labor Day weekend.   Family get-togethers are so very important!

 

 

 

NINE DAYS IN THE DELLS

We’re back. It’s good to be home.

We left home on Wednesday 8th October, driving to Lake Michigan and then catching the ferry across to Wisconsin, then driving another two hours to the Dells, where we joined about 800 other people observing the biblical Feast of Tabernacles.  We have enjoyed the Dells last year and this year – it’s a lovely place and it is wonderful to reconnect with good friends.  And we have some very good friends there!  It was certainly the highlight of our year!

While we were there, we shared a condo with our daughter, son-in-law and their four children. Also resident in the condo were Mike’s cousin Eric and his wife, Dorothy, with their three children.

It was great to have more time, especially with the two-year-old twins, Ethan and Evan. They soon wanted to sit on my knee and look at nursery rhymes on my laptop. Like their cousins in Lansing, they also love “Thomas, the Tank Engine.”   They also watched that on my laptop.

Mel and twins

I’d like to think they wanted time with their grandfather but I also reluctantly accept that the laptop is the attraction, with “Papa” the one who happens to control it.   They also came into our room first thing each morning, searching for a gift (we hid little Matchbox cars in our room for them to find – the girls got doll clothes). Grampa’s and Gramma’s room was soon staked out for it’s content of goodies – they would arrive each morning holding out their hand for a cookie.  We had a condo with a loft and they loved to go up there and drop things on our heads over the barricade – thankfully none of the plastic cups they dropped had water in them!

I find it amazing how different they are, considering they are twins. They shared a womb and popped out of it a minute or two apart but that is the end of the story. They look different and are built different. There is also a definite sibling rivalry there, which tended to manifest itself in church so we had to separate them during services.

I’m also amazed at how their two older sisters, Alyssa and Elena (9 and 7), help with their brothers. They carry the boys everywhere and help feed them and look after them. This makes things easier for both parents.

It was a week of bonding with our Indianapolis grandchildren.   We’re already looking forward to seeing them again for Thanksgiving. We’ll have all 8 of them then!

Now that we are back, I will start writing again on world affairs.

NURSERY RHYMES and THOMAS THE TANK ENGINE

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Providing daycare to two of our grandchildren has its challenges, especially when I’m also trying to write articles for my blog.

Every time I open my laptop to start writing (like now, this very minute), a 15-month-old comes over and wants to watch nursery rhymes.  His two-year-old brother is never far behind.  Both want to climb up on my knee to sit on my lap and watch, yet again, “Old MacDonald Had a Farm, E-I-E-I-O.”   They love it.

Some nursery rhymes have more music than others.  When we play the ones that have real “bounce,” they do exactly that – bounce up and down on my stomach and my bladder, the result is me rushing down the hallway to the bathroom, stepping on toys as I run!   Some of the toys emit musical sounds when I trip over them, competing with the nursery rhymes still playing on the computer.

After 20 minutes of nursery rhymes, around the time I’m thinking that one more “Old MacDonald” will see me heading for the nearest asylum, I switch them over to “Thomas the Tank Engine.”  We begin with familiar songs from Thomas, starting with “Boo! Boo! Choo-Choo,” which was really scary the first time but is now just another catchy number.  After “Boo! Boo!” we watch “Never, Never, Never Give Up,” another rousing Thomas number.  Sometimes, I follow that with an actual Thomas story.

Today, the Dowager Countess featured in the story.  Sorry, that’s Maggie Smith on “Downton Abbey.”  I mean “Dowager Hatt” on Thomas, the Tank Engine.  They are both very similar – not somebody to argue with!  They both like to have their own way – always!   I doubt there’s anybody else in America, indeed, in the world, who watches both “Downton Abbey” and “Thomas the Tank Engine,” but, I must confess, I do.

Thomas is set on the fictional island of Sodor.  At least, I think it’s fictional.  (Mental note – if it really exists, don’t go there!!!)   Downton is sort of fictional – it’s a fictional place with fictional characters but it’s filmed in an actual castle, Highclere Castle, not far from London, a castle occupied by the 8th Earl of Carnarvon and his wife.  My wife and I would very much like to visit, next time we are in the UK.  (Such a visit would also give me a break from further viewing of “Thomas” – by then, I may need extensive therapy to get over it!)

Anyway, it doesn’t matter what I like.  It’s all about the boys.  And they love “Thomas.”  Yesterday, I saw models of Percy, Thomas’ best friend.  So I bought two, one for each of the boys who live with us.   It was a wise thing to do – if I had bought one, we would have lived through non-stop fighting but two enables both to play with Percy at the same time without incident (until one gets lost or damaged, that is).  (Note from wife:  One already got chewed by the dog.)

I should probably go back and buy two more for the twins in Indianapolis, as we are visiting there in a few days.  However, I’m not sure they are in to Thomas and I don’t think the store had two more, anyway.  I will have to find something else for them.  Whatever gift I find, in a few days there will likely be four boys on my lap, all listening to nursery rhymes and using my stomach as a trampoline.

Aubren and Leeson are both now down for a nap, enabling me to write this and, hopefully, another article on a world news topic.   There’s a lot happening in the world and it can be overwhelming and negative – so perhaps it’s really good to take time out and watch a few episodes of “Thomas the Tank Engine” from time to time, interspersed with familiar nursery rhymes!